Forty Years On

2012 marked the 40th anniversary of the opening of Bewdley Museum.

The photographs below highlight the amount of work involved in that undertaking, and also how the Friends have managed to work with the community of Bewdley to rebuff attempts over the years to close this wonderful resource.

To ensure the future of the Museum the Friends need your support.

So become a member today;

Life membership is only £50 and you can complete a membership form here.

40 Years On Exhibition 2012

  • The Shambles in a very cold 1972

  • Press clippings showed early closure threats

  • Closure threats were regular!

  • The Shambles at the beginning

  • 1000's of bricks were cleaned and re-used

  • The Jailhouse prior to restoration

  • What is now the Wyre Forest Gallery (first curator John Hawes on the right)

  • 2007 Volunteers win Worcestershire Volunteers Awards

  • More funding raised in 2007

Exhibitions, Projects and Events

40 years on

The first exhibition by the Friends was in 2006 when they presented the work of ceramicist Simon Hancox. In each year since then the Friends have taken responsibility for one of the Museum's exhibition slots, selecting and researching the subject, forming an exhibition team and overseeing the work. Some of the more recent exhibitions are:

2008 Tickenhill Manor

2009 Every other House - A history of Bewdley Pubs

2010 Who pays the Ferryman - Ferry crossings on the River Severn

2011 Cuckoo Chance - In association with the Pound Green Commoners on the work of Edgar Chance

2012 40 Years on - History of Bewdley Museum to celebrate the Museum's 40th Anniversary Year

On this page you can see some of the fascinating pictures relating to the restoration and growth of Bewdley Museum.

Bewdley Open Studios [BOS]

Following on from the Bewdley Gateway Exhibition held in 2006 as part of the Rediscover Bewdley programme, the Friends played the lead role in setting up and establishing the highly successful annual Bewdley Open Studios event.

This event allows local artists and craftspeople to show off their work in their own homes and studios, in the Museum's galleries and at other venues around the town.